******************************************************

THE POINT OF CARE

******************************************************

 

Barcode-Enabled Point-of-Care Technology - Protecting the Patient in All of

Us.

Volume 2, Issue 4 - Winter 2002

 

******************************************************

CONTENTS

******************************************************

 

SPECIAL DELIVERY

+ White Paper Reviews Evidence of Barcoding Efficacy

 

LEGISLATIVE & REGULATORY

+ HHS Secretary calls for health care IT funding

+ Pressure growing to get Pharmas to utilize Barcode technology

+ Government should take lead to improve quality of care

+ IOM says Gov't Should Fund Demos

+ JCAHO seeks suggestions for future patient safety goals

+ JCAHO TO REQUIRE patient information at your fingertips

 

RESEARCH

+ Drug Dosing Is Major Cause of Hospital Errors

+ Adverse Drug Events and Malpractice Claims, Analyzed

+ Medical rounds with pharmacists equate fewer medication errors

+ Reporting Medication Errors Through Computerized Medication Administration

+ Hospital prescribing errors more than double across 5-year period

+ Identifying Clinically Significant Preventable Adverse Drug Events

+ Physician Experience Linked to Prescribing Errors in Pediatric ED

+ Study Finds Quality Care Can Be Good Business

 

TAKING ACTION

+ AHA, others unveil safety tools designed to cut medication errors

+ ISMP to Distribute Award-winning Bridge Beyond Blame Documentary

+ B. Braun Medical Inc. Launches 'Ask the B. Braun Safety Expert' Program

+ Nurses' hotline may help trim errors 

+ Heart Association Speaks Up on Medication Errors

+ Poll Shows Hospitals Making Effort to Improve Patient Safety

+ ISMP launches monthly newsletter for consumers

+ New web site on patient safety

+ Baxter Takes on the Bar Code Problem

+ American Pharmaceutical Partners Show Commitment To Barcoding

+ Task forces formed for national health information Coordination

+ NAHIT announces board members

 

BPOC IN THE NEWS

+ Miami Children's Hospital

+ CIO Roundtable: Ensuring patient safety

+ Robotic innovations speed recovery time, reduce medical errors

+ Three Trinity Hospitals to Implement BPOC Technology

+ Shepherd Center Tests BPOC System

+ Need for software savvy in push for patient safety

+ CAMC spending $12 million to replace computers at 3 hospitals

+ UW Hospital BPOC Study Reports 87 Percent Error Reduction

+ Codes of Help

+ Drug Safety Key Issue at Atlanta Pharmacy Conference

+ Memorial Healthcare System Offers Safer Medication

+ Danville Regional Advances BPOC system use

+ Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center barcoded bracelets

+ OSU Medical Center Expands medication safety program

+ IOM says VA Health System is 'Best in the Nation'

+ Fighting Medical Errors on a Binary Battlefield.

+ Phlebotomy collection identification products

 

CAUSE FOR CONCERN

+ NCQA: Quality Of Care Better, Concerns Remain

+ Survey Released on Medical Errors

+ California Regulators fault hospital for Heparin-related Patient Death

+ Checking Up on Medical Mistakes

+ No End to Errors

 

GRANTS

+ IT projects funded under $3M AHRQ grants

+ $1.5 Million Grant goes to Valley hospital effort to reduce errors

+ RWJF program to fund health care IT research

+ HHS awards $5.9 million contract to improve patient safety data collection

 

BRIDGE NEWS

+ AmerisourceBergen Finalizes Purchase of Bridge Medical, Inc

+ VHA to Measure Impact of Bridge Barcode Patient Safety System

+ SSM Health Care First to Win the Malcolm Baldridge Quality Award

+ Venture Company of the Year?

+ "The Impact of IT on Patient Safety" named HIMSS book of the year!

 

EVENTS

 

******************************************************

SPECIAL DELIVERY

******************************************************

WHITE PAPER REVIEWS EVIDENCE OF BARCODING EFFICACY

Bridge's new white paper reviews evidence of "The Effect of Barcode-enabled

Point of Care Technology on Patient Safety."

Notes Institute for Safe Medication Practices President Michael R. Cohen,

RPh, MS, DSc, FASHP, in the foreword: "As stakeholders in the quality

improvement of this nation's healthcare, we must recognize the vulnerability

of the patient in all of us. When a practice or technology exists that is

proven to reduce error, it is our shared responsibility to communicate its

efficacy. A technology has begun to take center stage demonstrating

impressive results and demanding our attention. Barcode enabled

point-of-care (BPOC) systems provide a safeguard against error at the most

vulnerable stage in the medication use process-during administration.

Peer-reviewed studies validating BPOC technology efficacy, industry movement

to establish a healthcare barcoding standard, and the announcement of a

future FDA ruling mandating manufacturer-applied barcodes testify to BPOC

systems' coming of age. Its effective use can save lives and dollars while

increasing overall staff efficiency."

In addition to describing how BPOC systems can be used to prevent medication

administration errors in the hospital setting, the Bridge literature review

examines the efficacy of barcoding in preventing blood transfusion and

laboratory specimen collection errors. A free copy is available at:

http://www.bridgemedical.com/pdf/whitepaper_barcode.pdf

 

******************************************************

LEGISLATIVE & REGULATORY

******************************************************

HHS SECRETARY CALLS FOR HEALTH CARE IT FUNDING

iHealthBeat, December 10, 2002

HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson has proposed federal funding to increase the

health care industry's use of information technology, USA Today reported.

Thompson urged Congress to pass a "mini Hill-Burton law" to fund hospitals'

deployment of IT applications; the 1946 Hill-Burton Act provided grants to

modernize hospitals that had become outdated.

Thompson also proposed that the government create standards and provide

funding for technologies that could reduce paperwork and improve medical

care. The FDA, for example, will issue a rule requiring pharmaceutical

companies to label medications with bar codes that could be linked to a bar

code on a patient's wrist band, ensuring proper drug administration,

Thompson said.

 

PRESSURE GROWING TO GET PHARMAS TO UTILIZE BARCODE TECHNOLOGY

ePharm5, October 3, 2002

Following Abbott Laboratory's announcement in July that it would put

barcodes on all of its injectable drugs and IV solutions by 2003, Pfizer has

decided to follow suit, according to a report in Drug Topics. In addition to

the National Drug Code (NDC), manufacturer information and package size

planned for Abbott's barcode, Pfizer will also include the lot number and

expiration date on unit-dose blisterpacks.

While VA hospitals have experienced a reduction in medication errors since

implementing barcodes and bedside scanning, whether or not other pharmcos

will adopt the technology remains a question. However, Drug Topics reports

that pressure to implement barcodes from interest groups eager to reduce

medical errors will continue to grow.

 

GOVERNMENT SHOULD TAKE LEAD TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF CARE

 iHealthBeat, October 30, 2002

The federal government should offer financial incentives to providers who

improve care and make data comparing quality of care publicly available,

according to a report released by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). The

report, which examined safety and quality in six government health care

programs, also called for government support to develop computerized

clinical and patient records and a national health information

infrastructure. 

 Link:

http://www4.nationalacademies.org/news.nsf/isbn/0309086163?OpenDocument

 

IOM SAYS GOV'T SHOULD FUND DEMOS

Information technology is one of a handful of areas offering the greatest

potential for improving the American health care system, according to a new

report from the Institute of Medicine, "Fostering Rapid Advances in Health

Care: Learning from System Demonstrations," that recommends demonstration

projects-with substantial government funding-In five areas. They include

I.T., expanded insurance coverage, malpractice reform, chronic disease

management and primary care enhancement.

The report recommends up to 10 initial demonstration projects and 25

second-generation projects to develop information systems that virtually

eliminate paper-based processes in demonstration sites within five years.

Link: www.nap.edu/catalog/10565.html?onpi_newsdoc1192002

 

JCAHO SEEKS SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE PATIENT SAFETY GOALS

The Joint Commission has provided an online form on the JCAHO website with

which you may make a suggestion for future patient safety goals.  

Link:

http://www.jcaho.org/accredited+organizations/patient+safety/npsg/npsg_alt.h

tm

 

JCAHO TO REQUIRE PATIENT INFORMATION AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

It's common practice for caregivers to obtain important patient information

when dispensing medications. But with the proposed revision of the JCAHO's

medication standard TX.3.2, the accreditor more clearly specifies what

medical information caregivers need to consider.  According to the draft

standard TX.3.2, "health care professionals involved in the medication use

process have access to and use patient and medication information important

in the prescribing, dispensing, administration and monitoring of

medications."

Reviews will be looking to see that the prescriber, pharmacist, and

appropriate clinical staff receive, have readily available access to and use

of pertinent data at the time of prescribing, dispensing or administering

medications. Examples of minimum information that should be readily

available include the following:

+ Age

+ Weight

+ Diagnosis

+ Co-morbidities (e.g., renal failure, diabetes)

+ Pregnancy and lactation status

+ Medication allergies and past sensitivities

+ Current medications, including prescription, over-the-counter, herbal

medications, and home remedies used as an alternative to other medications.

 

******************************************************

RESEARCH

******************************************************

DRUG DOSING IS MAJOR CAUSE OF HOSPITAL ERRORS

The Wall Street Journal, Wednesday, December 4, 2002

Although most hospital medication mistakes are discovered and corrected

quickly, some are fatal, reported a study released by the U.S.

Pharmacopeia's Center for the Advancement of Patient Safety. The study found

that 2.4%, of the medication errors documented in 2001 by participating

American hospitals resulted in patient injury or fatality.

The study attributes the errors largely to workload increases for doctors

and nurses. Distractions were the most common cause of error but were often

combined with other factors. Inexperienced or inadequate staff accounted for

about 43% of the factors contributing to errors, an increase from 33% in

2000 and 27% in 1999.

Data for the study were voluntarily provided by 368 health-care facilities

across the country and compiled by MedMARx, a database administered by U.S.

Pharmacopeia.

Link: http://www.usp.org/

 

ADVERSE DRUG EVENTS AND MALPRACTICE CLAIMS, ANALYZED

A study published in Archives of Internal Medicine conducted a retrospective

analysis of malpractice insurance company claims records from January 1,

1990, to December 31, 1999.  Each case was screened for possible Adverse

Drug Events (ADEs).  Results of the study showed that ADEs represented 6.3

percent of claims. ADEs were judged preventable in 73 percent of the cases

and were nearly evenly divided between outpatient and inpatient settings.

Link: http://archinte.ama-assn.org/issues/v162n21/rfull/ioi10847.html

(Subscription Required)

 

MEDICAL ROUNDS WITH PHARMACISTS EQUATE FEWER MEDICATION ERRORS

According to a study in the Nov. 1 issue of the American Journal of

Health-System Pharmacy, pharmacist participation in daily medical rounds

reduced medication errors by 51%. Nearly 80% of the patients in the control

group had a medication error, the study found. It noted that the mean length

of stay, cost and mortality nearly double for patients with an adverse drug

reaction.

Link: http://www.ashp.org/public/pubs/ajhp. (subscription required)

 

REPORTING MEDICATION ERRORS THROUGH COMPUTERIZED MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION

Low DK, Belcher JV. Comput Inform Nurs 2002 Sep-Oct;20(5):178-183

The purpose of this study was to compare medication error rate per 1,000

doses administered before and after the implementation of a barcode

medication administration system. The study was conducted on two

medical-surgical units at a Midwest government hospital 12 months both

before and after the implementation of the Bar Code Medication

Administration system. The medication error rate per 1,000 doses

administered by a nurse after implementation of the Bar Code Medication

Administration system showed an 18% increase. The results probably do not

indicate an increase in medication errors but rather an increase in the

number of medication errors reported. This research highlights problems with

programs evaluating medication errors and new technology implementation.

 

HOSPITAL PRESCRIBING ERRORS MORE THAN DOUBLE ACROSS 5-YEAR PERIOD

Journal of General Internal Medicine 2002;17:579-587. 

Based on a review of dosage form errors at one hospital during that 5-year

period, Dr. Timothy S. Lesar of the Albany Medical Center in Albany, New

York, found that the rate of these errors increased from slightly higher

than 0.6 for each 100 patients in 1996 to 1.3 per 100 patients in 2000.

Given these findings, Lesar writes that patients admitted to the hospital

are "at risk for adverse outcomes due to prescribing errors."

As to why the rate of these errors appears to be on the rise, the researcher

told Reuters Health that more medications are now available in different

forms, which increases the chance that mistakes will occur.

 

IDENTIFYING CLINICALLY SIGNIFICANT PREVENTABLE ADVERSE DRUG EVENTS

Winterstein AG, Hatton RC, Gonzalez-Rothi R et al. American Journal of

Health-System Pharmacy

This study analyzed the ability of a hospital's adverse drug reaction (ADR)

database to identify common and repeated patterns of preventable adverse

drug events (ADEs). Although 93 drugs were associated with ADEs, only 10

drugs accounted for more than 60% of the events. Analysis and categorization

by type of error and outcome suggested that three high-priority preventable

ADEs accounted for 50% of all reports:

(1)  overdoses of anti-coagulants or insufficient monitoring and

adjustments (according to laboratory test values) were associated with

hemorrhagic events,

(2)  overdosing or failure to adjust for drug-drug interactions of opiate

agonists was associated with somnolence and respiratory depression, and

(3)  inappropriate dosing or insufficient monitoring of insulins was

associated with hypoglycemia.

 

PHYSICIAN EXPERIENCE LINKED TO PRESCRIBING ERRORS IN PEDIATRIC ED

ECRI's Healthcare Risk Control Weekly News, October 9, 2002

Prescribing errors were found in 10% of patients in a pediatric emergency

department at a Toronto, Ontario, Canada hospital, according to a review in

the October 2002 Pediatrics. The review found that a physician's level of

training was the most significant risk factor for errors. Medical trainees

were more likely to commit the errors than staff physicians, although error

rates among trainees decreased as the academic year progressed. In addition,

errors were most likely to occur between 4 and 8 a.m. and on weekends.

 

STUDY FINDS QUALITY CARE CAN BE GOOD BUSINESS

The Virginia Health Quality Center released results of a national study

demonstrating that quality improvement activities can have business benefits

for hospitals and physician offices. The study, "Making the Case for the

Business Benefits of Health Care Quality Improvement Program Projects,"

shows that in addition to better patient care, quality improvement projects

can provide direct and indirect financial rewards to hospitals and physician

offices, including increases in revenue and improved efficiency.

The study also found that:

+ Improved efficiency reduced average hospital length of stay and decreased

staffing costs.

+ Higher profits result from greater patient volume, increased

reimbursements due to higher intensity patient visits, and increased use of

ancillary services in physician offices.

+ Quality has other benefits including enhanced reputation, improved

employee retention, improved physician satisfaction, satisfaction of

accreditation requirements for quality improvement, and reduced exposure to

liability as a result of reduced errors.

Link: http://www.vhqc.org/.

 

******************************************************

TAKING ACTION

******************************************************

AHA, OTHERS UNVEIL SAFETY TOOLS DESIGNED TO CUT MEDICATION ERRORS

A set of tools designed to reduce medication errors and help hospitals take

a system-based approach to address such errors was released at the 37th

American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Midyear Clinical Meeting. The

tools -- Pathways for Medication Safety -- were developed by the AHA, the

Health Research and Educational Trust and the Institute for Safe Medication

Practices with support from The Commonwealth Fund. Organized in a modular

format to suit different organizations and professionals, the three main

Pathways components will help hospital leaders plan for medication safety;

identify error-prone processes; and prepare to implement a bedside

bar-coding system for administering medications.

Pathways for Medication Safety is available free of charge at

http://www.medpathways.info/.

 

ISMP TO DISTRIBUTE AWARD-WINNING BRIDGE BEYOND BLAME DOCUMENTARY

On Dec. 9, 1997, "Beyond Blame" premiered in Atlanta. The ten-minute film

premiered at Atlanta's historic Fox Theater during the 1997 Midyear Clinical

Meeting of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Since then, it

has been distributed by the American Hospital Association to all its members

and used by Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals in new employee

training. An estimated 15,000 copies have been distributed in total.

In December, Beyond Blame producer Bridge Medical officially donated

exclusive Beyond Blame distribution rights, and all ensuing video revenues,

to the Institute for Safe Medical Practices.

 

B. BRAUN MEDICAL INC. LAUNCHES 'ASK THE B. BRAUN SAFETY EXPERT' PROGRAM

Business Wire, Tuesday, October 15, 2002

B. Braun Medical Inc. introduced its Ask the B. Braun Safety Expert program,

a free service designed to provide clinicians and healthcare consumers with

answers to questions about some of today's most pressing healthcare safety

issues. By dialing 1-888-800-6668 or by sending an email to

SafetyExpert@bbraunusa.com, individuals will have access to B. Braun's panel

of safety experts comprised of clinicians and nurses with practical

experience in handling numerous patient and clinician safety issues. B.

Braun safety experts are available to answer questions across the spectrum -

from basic safety questions like "What is the cost of medication errors in

the U.S. today?" to more complex safety issues like "How can barcoding IV

solutions reduce medication errors at the point of care?" In the near

future, individuals will also have access to the Ask the B. Braun Safety

Expert program through the company's web site, http://www.bbraunusa.com.

 

NURSES' HOTLINE MAY HELP TRIM ERRORS 

The Denver Post Monday, November 25, 2002

Operating room nurses worried that procedures aren't being followed or that

medications may be labeled in a way that causes confusion now have a place

to turn for help.  The Association of periOperative Registered Nurses has

set up a toll-free hotline that nurses can call with all kinds of concerns.

The hotline is part of a comprehensive program aimed at helping nurses

reduce the number of errors in patient care. When a nurse calls the hotline

he or she leaves a message and an association nurse calls back with an

answer or advice within 24 hours. Nurses can also e-mail the association

with questions and concerns.

 

HEART ASSOCIATION SPEAKS UP ON MEDICATION ERRORS

The American Heart Association, in a scientific statement issued Nov. 12 and

published in Circulation, said the medical community "can reduce the

frequency and clinical impact of medication errors by enhancing error

detection rates, using appropriate methods for reporting errors, and

implementing safer methods of drug ordering, dispensing, and tracking."

Link: http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/106/20/2623 (subscription

required)

 

POLL SHOWS HOSPITALS MAKING EFFORT TO IMPROVE PATIENT SAFETY

PR Newswire, Thursday, October 24, 2002

In the face of a work force shortage that contributes to medical errors,

90%of poll respondents at the Partnership Symposium 2002: Smart Designs for

Patient Safety in Washington, D.C. said they believe their organizations

have made a credible effort to improve patient safety. More than a third of

the respondents said that hospital pharmacies are addressing patient safety

the best within their organizations. Sixty-four percent of attendees

responding to the poll indicated that in addition to a committed effort to

improve patient safety, health care organizations have embraced technology

as a tool to facilitate improvements. According to the survey, most commonly

used tools include barcoding, bedside computer stations, robotic pharmacy

carts, and online error reporting mechanisms.

 

ISMP LAUNCHES MONTHLY NEWSLETTER FOR CONSUMERS

The Institute for Safe Medication Practices has announced a new,

easy-to-read newsletter called "Safe Medicine," designed especially for

patients and nonclinical hospital employees. This monthly publication

focuses exclusively on preventing medication errors.

Link: http://www.ismp.org/ConsumerArticles/index.htm.

 

NEW WEB SITE ON PATIENT SAFETY

Healthcare professionals involved in patient safety improvement activities

will soon have a new resource - an online case-based journal and forum on

patient safety and healthcare quality. Supported by a contract from the

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, WebM&M is designed to educate

healthcare providers about medical errors in an engaging, anonymous, and

blame-free environment.

Link: http://webmm.ahrq.gov/

 

BAXTER TAKES ON THE BAR CODE PROBLEM

HealthData Management, December 10, 2002

Baxter Healthcare Corp. has introduced bar code technology for flexible IV

bags that includes lot number and expiration date information. A lot number

helps identify and track batches of product, which is critical in pulling

products subject to a recall.

Until now, the industry has had difficulty putting lot number and expiration

date information on bar codes for a number of technical reasons. Now, Baxter

has developed computer-controlled printing technology that uses heat

transfer to apply a bar code directly to the IV bag. The code can be updated

via the computer keyboard, enabling real-time ability to modify a code to

include a lot number and expiration date. Baxter calls the new technology

Enlightened Bar Coding.

Link: http://www.baxter.com/.

 

AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL PARTNERS SHOW COMMITMENT TO BARCODING

BUSINESS WIRE, Dec. 6, 2002

American Pharmaceutical Partners, Inc. (APP), is leading the pharmaceutical

industry with its commitment to enhancing patient safety and reducing

medication errors in hospitals by being the first to apply barcodes at the

unit-of-use level to all new injectable products launched in 2001, including

the smallest 2mL vials. APP continued this patient quality enhancement

effort throughout 2002. With 70% of APP's products already barcoded, APP now

reaffirms its commitment to complete this initiative. The company expects to

be manufacturing the remaining hospital injectables with barcodes by Jan. 1,

2003.

Establishing a system-wide barcoding initiative within a healthcare facility

is a huge undertaking that requires the commitment of already scarce

monetary and human resources. To make the implementation as seamless and

cost-efficient as possible for its customers, two years ago APP decided to

begin incorporating barcodes on drug vials at the individual unit-of-use

level with the most common symbology used today--UPC. This symbology is the

industry standard and therefore compatible with virtually all barcode

scanners currently on the market.

 

TASK FORCES FORMED FOR NATIONAL HEALTH INFORMATION COORDINATION

iHealthBeat, October 17, 2002

The Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society announced a task

force charged with developing plans for a national health information

infrastructure. The NHII Task Force will first examine the current state of

health care information technology and identify areas for development. The

group is also charged with developing a prototype NHII and incorporating

feedback from HIMSS members and other health care leaders. 

The National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics, an advisory body to

HHS, is also examining ways to develop a NHII. In December 2001, NCVHS

released a report that outlined ways that government, industry, advocacy

groups and consumer organizations could work together to build a health

information system.

HIMSS Link: http://www.himss.org/ASP/ContentRedirector.asp?ContentId=22401

NCVHS Link: http://ncvhs.hhs.gov/nhiilayo.pdf

 

NAHIT ANNOUNCES BOARD MEMBERS

The National Alliance for Health Information Technology announced the

appointment of its inaugural board of directors. The NAHIT board, which

includes Bridge Medical President and CEO John B. Grotting, is responsible

for strategic planning, establishing an agenda of project priorities, and

oversight of the organization and its key deliverables. The Alliance works

to develop voluntary standards for health information technology.

For a list of board members go to:

http://www.bridgemedical.com/news_2002_37.shtml.

 

******************************************************

BPOC IN THE NEWS

******************************************************

MIAMI CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL

Excerpts from The Miami Herald Nov. 13, 2002

Miami Children's Hospital is the first freestanding pediatric hospital in

Florida to use MedPoint, a barcode-based computer system that verifies the

''five rights'' of administering medicine -- the right patient, the right

drug, the right dose, the right time that it should be given and checks for

safe levels.

Medicine bar coding has been done since the 1980s, but it started taking off

when a 1999 report by the Institute of Medicine showed that improper

administration of medications in hospitals was alarmingly high -- about 30

percent, according to Connie Chan, director of pharmacy at Miami Children's.

 

''The whole purpose of technology is to minimize human error. This will

force the human side to acknowledge the process,'' Chan said.

The barcoding system is especially valuable for pediatric wards because it's

harder to give children standard doses of medicines. Now, with the MedPoint

system, doses will be determined by volume and weight. Miami Children's

nurse Cheryl Topps said the MedPoint barcoding system has taken into

consideration the tiniest of infant patients.

Link: http://www.bridgemedical.com/media_cov_11_13_02.shtml

 

CIO ROUNDTABLE: ENSURING PATIENT SAFETY

ADVANCE for Health Information Executives, Nov. 2002

In a recent issue of ADVANCE for Health Information Executives, CIO

panelists-including John Hummel-discussed how they are safeguarding patients

and how quality initiatives are streamlining processes. Hummel is CIO/SVP of

information technology at Sutter Health, a Sacramento (Calif.)-based health

system currently implementing the Bridge MedPoint barcode-enabled point of

care system at 26 hospitals in northern California.

"The bottom line so far for Sutter has been that we need to look beyond CPOE

for patient safety. We need to look at our timelines and determine what we

can do to make the biggest impact in the shortest time for patient safety.

CPOE will get done, but requires such a huge change in our physical culture

and training that it will simply take time to complete," said Hummel.

He continued, "[With CPOE] we still didn't have that double check at the

point of administration. Thus, with a barcoding system, we could take that

extra step to help to further reduce or eliminate the ADE problem in patient

care."

http://www.bridgemedical.com/media_cov_11_02_2.shtml

 

ROBOTIC INNOVATIONS SPEED RECOVERY TIME, REDUCE MEDICAL ERRORS

NurseWeek, December 5, 2002

While some hospitals are experimenting with robotic surgery, others are

tapping into the latest computerized technologies with high-tech

prescription delivery systems.

Nurses who use this new technology begin by scanning three things: a bar

code imprinted on the patient's ID, their own ID and the prescription. These

three codes must match to verify the drug, dose, time and route.

Hospital medication errors received national attention in November 1999 when

the Institute of Medicine reported that thousands of deaths occur in

hospitals as a result of medical errors.

NurseWeek reported on Southwest Washington Medical Center in Vancouver,

Wash., where nurses are using a new barcode-enabled point of care (BPOC)

system to safeguard patients from medication errors.

Each month, the medical center prepares an average of 300,000 doses of

medication. BPOC Systems have proved to reduce medication errors by more

than 80 percent by catching potential errors before they occur, according to

a study published in the winter edition of the Journal of Healthcare

Information Management.

In August, California's Sutter Health network of hospitals announced plans

to implement the new Bridge MedPoint medication delivery system in all of

their medical centers within the next three years, reported NurseWeek.

"From a nurse's perspective, I think this is one of the most exciting new

technologies to be introduced in recent years," said Susan Bumatay, MSN, RN,

assistant administrator and chief nurse executive at Sutter Delta Medical

Center in Antioch, Calif., one of the first six Sutter Health hospitals to

implement the technology.

"The task of routinely administering medication has become much more complex

in recent years," Bumatay said. "There are more than 17,000 pharmaceuticals

in use in the United States today, and many of them have names that look and

sound alike, which can be confusing."

http://www.bridgemedical.com/media_cov_12_5_02.shtml

 

THREE TRINITY HOSPITALS TO IMPLEMENT BPOC TECHNOLOGY

PRNewswire, December 3, 2002

Three members of the Trinity Health, Novi Michigan, have made a commitment

to improve patient safety by investing in proven state-of-the-art scanning

technology.  Saint Agnes Medical Center, Mercy Medical Center - North Iowa

and Mercy Medical Center - Dubuque will each implement a complete system for

scanning bar coded medications, patient wristbands and caregiver badges to

ensure the `5 Rights' of medication administration. 

Saint Agnes Medical Center, a 330-bed hospital in Fresno, Calif. became the

first Trinity hospital to contract for a medication verification system.

According to Lynn Miyamoto, director of clinical systems, the facility will

implement the system to better ensure compliance with California's Senate

Bill 1875.  Under the terms of the Bill, on or before January 1, 2005,

California hospitals must implement a formal plan to eliminate or

substantially reduce medication-related errors. 

 

SHEPHERD CENTER TESTS BPOC SYSTEM

Shepherd Center in Atlanta, Georgia, a 100-bed catastrophic care hospital

specializing in treating spinal cord injuries, acquired brain injuries,

multiple sclerosis, and other neuromuscular illnesses and urological

problems, announced that they will conclude beta testing of their BPOC

software and they expected to be deployed facility-wide in mid-January.

 

NEED FOR SOFTWARE SAVVY IN PUSH FOR PATIENT SAFETY

CAP Today, October 2002

A recent article by Suzanne Butch, chief technologist of the blood bank and

transfusion service, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor,

advocates barcoding for transfusion safety. In fact, Butch contends that,

"the same patient-identification system ideally should be used throughout

the hospital for all patient care, not just laboratory specimens and

transfusions."

Link: http://www.bridgemedical.com/patient_lab_specimen2.shtml

 

CAMC SPENDING $12 MILLION TO REPLACE COMPUTERS AT 3 HOSPITALS

Charleston Gazette, Wednesday, November 20, 2002

Charleston Area Medical Center officials plan to replace the computer

information system at the three hospitals at a cost of $12 million. With new

systems, geared toward patient safety, physicians, nurses, pharmacists and

others will gradually replace all written orders with electronic orders,

whether via a hand-held computer or other hardware, to decrease possible

human mistakes. Prescription medications will contain barcodes that match

the codes patients wear on identification bracelets.

 

UW HOSPITAL BPOC STUDY REPORTS 87 PERCENT ERROR REDUCTION

PR Newswire, Wednesday, November 13, 2002

An in-depth study at the University of Wisconsin (UW) Hospital and Clinics

shows the hospital has reduced medication administration errors by 87% with

the use of barcode-enabled point of care (BPOC) verification technology.  UW

Hospital is employing a hand-held wireless barcode scanner that caregivers

use at the point of care to ensure that the five key aspects of medication

administration are correct, thereby reducing medication errors. The results

show dramatic improvements in medication administration and documentation

accuracy, based on a direct observational study of caregivers by trained

observers. 

Following BPOC implementation, the prevalence of wrong dose, wrong dosage

form and omission errors were observed to decrease by more than 90%, while

medications given at the wrong time dropped by over 75%.

Other outcomes from the introduction of BPOC technology included dramatic

improvements in medication administration record documentation accuracy,

with post-implementation accuracy exceeding 99 percent.  Additionally, pre-

and post-implementation nurse satisfaction surveys have demonstrated a 42

percent overall improvement in nurse satisfaction with the medication

administration and documentation process, and a 64 percent improvement in

nurse perception of system efficiency and safety. 

 

CODES OF HELP

Newsweek, Monday, November 18, 2002

New York Methodist Hospital in Brooklyn, in a move designed to cut down on

medical errors, is trying out a new system that uses barcode scanners to

make sure the right patients are getting the right doses of intravenous

drugs. The FDA has already started pushing for barcode labeling on bottles

and packets of oral and injectable medications. But since a third of

hospital errors occur when IV pumps are programmed incorrectly--a problem

that wouldn't be entirely solved by the FDA's proposal-- new systems like

the one at Methodist take the concept further by automating the programming

process. Prescription labels generated in the hospital pharmacy are stuck to

IV bags. Nurses scan barcodes on the labels to make sure they match codes on

patient ID tags--and then program the IV pumps by simply swiping the labels

again.

 

DRUG SAFETY KEY ISSUE AT ATLANTA PHARMACY CONFERENCE

BW HealthWire, Dec. 3, 2002

Medication safety expert Susanne Larrabee, RPh, shared her experiences in

using barcode technology to protect patients from medication errors at the

ASHP Midyear Clinical Meeting in Atlanta. A pioneer in the development and

implementation of BPOC medication safety technology, Larrabee discussed the

institutional benefits of a BPOC medication administration system.

The Northern Michigan Hospital clinical pharmacist and her colleagues in

Petoskey have been using BPOC technology from Bridge Medical to protect

patients from preventable medication errors since 1998. "MedPoint has not

only prevented a significant number of potential errors, but the information

we have gained through its use has allowed us to do root cause analysis and

change some of our processes," explained Larrabee, "insuring that we are

eliminating the sources for potential errors in our medication delivery

process."

 

MEMORIAL HEALTHCARE SYSTEM OFFERS SAFER MEDICATION

PR Newswire, Tuesday, October 22, 2002 

Memorial Healthcare System (Hollywood, Fla.) will begin using a new system

to support medication safety during inpatient care. They system will provide

electronic alerts and replace handwritten processes to prevent medication

errors. Memorial's immediate goal is to use wireless barcode scanning

technology, electronic patient information and automated charting to check

the accuracy of each medication dosage administered to each patient, and to

automatically record the drug, dose, and time of administration in the

patient's chart.

 

DANVILLE REGIONAL ADVANCES BPOC SYSTEM USE

Excerpts from Sublett P. Health Management Technology, November 2002

Danville Regional Medical Center (DRMC) helped develop a BPOC application.

The two major technology elements of the system are wireless computers

containing electronic medical records that are mounted on a medication cart

and wheeled into the patient's room, and wireless barcode scanners. The

account of this development process, published in Health management

Technology, said the biggest implementation hurdle for many nurses was

getting into the habit of wheeling the wireless computers into their

patients' rooms every time they administered medication. There was an eight

to ten week learning curve for the nursing staff to become comfortable with

the system.

Today, all DRMC nurses use the system, and no DRMC inpatient anywhere in the

facility receives medication without using the barcode verification

technology. Since enterprise-wide implementation in early 2002, DRMC has

documented an average of 84 to 264 potential errors prevented each week. The

system has since earned overwhelming support from the nursing staff by

relieving their apprehension about making errors, reducing their

administrative burden, and promoting accurate documentation and charge

capture, thereby improving efficiency.

An average of 50 phone calls per day to the pharmacy have been eliminated

because the system facilitates message communication between nurses and the

pharmacy. Fewer interruptions to the pharmacy order entry process means a

decreased chance for potential medication errors. The system also alerts the

nurse if there is any clinical data that must be collected at the time of

medication administration, which promotes complete documentation. That

information is transferred to the clinical repository and enables physicians

to view the patient's complete status at the touch of a button.

Link: http://www.healthmgttech.com/

 

SUNRISE HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTER BARCODED BRACELETS

Las Vegas Review-Journal, Monday, October 07, 2002

Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center patients now wear a barcoded bracelet

that nurses scan to ensure the patient gets the correct medication in the

correct dose at the appropriate time. The new computer barcoding system

provides an extra safety check to help prevent medical mistakes. Nurses scan

the patient's wrist, much like food items are scanned in a grocery store,

whenever medication is given. The patient's information then pops up on a

portable computer screen, flashing a warning signal if anything is amiss.

The scanning system also double checks for any drug interactions.

Patients admitted to Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center will receive the

special barcoded bracelet upon arrival. The barcode tells a nurse via

computer the patient's current drug history, any lab work results, doctors'

orders and the patient's allergies.

Hospital Corporation of America, Sunrise Hospital's parent company, plans to

incorporate the new technology in all of its 200 facilities nationwide.

Link:

http://www.reviewjournal.com/lvrj_home/2002/Oct-07-Mon-2002/news/19770735.ht

ml

 

OSU MEDICAL CENTER EXPANDS MEDICATION SAFETY PROGRAM

PR Newswire, Wednesday, October 23, 2002

The Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) is ensuring accuracy

throughout the medication-use process, by providing barcode packaging on ALL

medications.  Newly acquired pharmacy automation systems will provide an

important starting point in the OSUMC strategy for barcode scanning at the

bedside.  Until that time, the goal is to use barcodes on medications for a

double-check before they leaving the pharmacy.

 

IOM SAYS VA HEALTH SYSTEM IS 'BEST IN THE NATION'

PR Newswire, Thursday, October 31, 2002

An IOM report, entitled Leadership by Example, lauded VA's use of

performance measures to improve quality in clinical disciplines and in

ambulatory, hospital and long-term care.

The IOM report also cited the VA's electronic medical record system and Bar

Code Medication Administration  (BCMA) program as essential tools for

improving health care quality and patient safety.  Earlier this year, the

BCMA program won the 2002 Pinnacle Award, a top honor by the American

Pharmaceutical Association Foundation.

Link: http://www.houston.med.va.gov/pressreleases/news_20021101a.html

 

FIGHTING MEDICAL ERRORS ON A BINARY BATTLEFIELD.

Excerpts from Health Data Management, Monday, September 30, 2002

According to Richard Kremsdorf, M.D., president of Five Rights Consulting

Inc., a San Diego-based health care consulting firm, hospitals can take

interim error reduction steps in moving toward a long-term goal of

automating order entry.

"What makes CPOE so advanced is bringing things like lab data to bear when

physicians write the orders," he says. "Physician order entry is important,

but I'm not sure it's the place to start. There are simpler things to do

first and build toward it."

For example, barcode-enabled medication administration systems and

intravenous drug administration and analysis applications can provide much

needed patient safety checks.

Vanderbilt University Medical Center helped develop sophisticated IV pump

technology to prevent errors in medication administration. The finished pump

analyzes any potential error the system detected during medication

administration. It also enables clinicians to explain how the error

occurred, so the medical center can change work processes to avoid repeating

the mistake.  According to Irene Hatcher, R.N.C., case management

coordinator and chair of the hospital's product and supplies analysis

committee, the IV system is helping. Intensive care units, "where a lot of

medication orders are verbal," Hatcher says, are especially vulnerable to

medication errors. "Even the best CPOE system is not going to catch all of

those."

Link:

http://www.healthdatamanagement.com/HDMSearchResultsDetails.cfm?DID=13102

 

PHLEBOTOMY COLLECTION IDENTIFICATION PRODUCTS

MLO-Medical Laboratory Observer, Sept. 2002

Despite breathtaking technological advances in clinical testing over the

years that have eliminated many sources of human error, progress in patient

identification and specimen labeling has lagged behind, with the exception

of the development of preprinted labels. Where once the phlebotomist had to

handwrite the patient's identification on the tube, today's laboratory

information systems provide preprinted labels. However, even when preprinted

labels are made in the laboratory and carried to the patient's side, many

opportunities for human error exist.

When phlebotomists rely on manual methods to identify their patients, errors

can occur at two critical steps in the process: in the identification of the

patient, and in the labeling of the specimen. The patient might be sleepy or

disoriented from medication and unable to verify his or her name, or the

wristband might be blurry, difficult to read in low light, or even missing.

A label with the name of another patient could be put by mistake on the

specimen tube.

The trend in positive patient identification is toward mobile computing and

barcoding, in phlebotomy as well as pharmacy, transfusion, and other

services. Today, a caregiver can walk into a patient's room, scan his or her

own barcoded ID badge as well as the patient's barcoded wristband, read the

orders for that draw from a handheld data terminal, draw the specimen, print

a detailed label at the bedside, then later upload the draw information into

the lab information system.

Link:  http://www.bridgemedical.com/media_cov_9_02_2.shtml

 

******************************************************

CAUSE FOR CONCERN

******************************************************

NCQA: QUALITY OF CARE BETTER, CONCERNS REMAIN

The National Committee for Quality Assurance 's State of Health Care Quality

report found that despite continued clinical quality improvements, more than

6,000 deaths and 22 million sick days could be avoided annually if "best

practice" care found at the nation's top organizations were adopted

universally.

Link: http://www.ahqa.org/pub/connections/162_696_2585.cfm - ncqa

 

SURVEY RELEASED ON MEDICAL ERRORS

Most physicians believe that reducing medical errors should be a national

priority, but are much less likely than the public to believe quality of

care is a problem, according to a new survey. The study, published in the

Archives of Internal Medicine, found that 67.6% of people surveyed in

households believed quality of care is a significant problem while just

29.1% of Colorado physicians and 34.9% of physicians nationwide agreed.

Link: http://www.archinternmed.com/

 

CALIFORNIA REGULATORS FAULT HOSPITAL FOR HEPARIN-RELATED PATIENT DEATH

THE PRESS-ENTERPRISE 12/03/2002

State regulators found a compounding string of problems at Riverside County

Regional Medical Center leading up to the accidental drug overdose that

contributed to a patient's death in June. A state investigation found the

hospital relied on murky guidelines governing the use of the anti-clotting

drug Heparin, failed to make those guidelines readily available to nurses

and failed to supervise the work of pharmacists who might have caught the

error.

The investigation was triggered by the death of Jeffery Owens, a 40-year-old

Moreno Valley man who bled to death after receiving 100 times more Heparin

than he was supposed to get. Owens, a stabbing victim, arrived at the

hospital bleeding from his chest wounds, and his blood pressure continued to

fall. Dr. David Bolivar, a surgical resident, decided to use Owens' blood

for transfusion later during surgery. The nurse asked Bolivar how much

Heparin to use in the blood collection device to prevent clotting until

surgery.  According to the coroner's report, Bolivar was unable to tell her

the correct dose. The nurse asked a blood bank worker and a hospital

pharmacist for guidance, but neither could provide an answer.

The nurse told the coroner's investigator she couldn't find the correct dose

in a procedures manual, and that instructions to the collection device were

on the floor, soaked in blood and unreadable. The nurse said she thought she

was giving Owens 1,000 units of Heparin. Instead, she administered five

ampules, each containing 20,000 units, the coroner's report stated.

In the wake of Owens' death, the hospital has eliminated the use of Heparin

with transfusion systems that use the patient's own blood. Physician must

provide written orders specifying how much anti-coagulant to use if it is

needed. Emergency department nurses will review auto-transfusion procedures

and all other low-volume, high-risk procedures at least every six months,

according to the state's report.  The hospital also has placed care

guidelines at nursing stations, along with laminated reference cards for all

low-volume, high-risk procedures.

 

CHECKING UP ON MEDICAL MISTAKES

Washington Post Thursday, December 12, 2002; Page A06

About 7% of physicians and 10% of the general public say that someone in

their family has died as the result of preventable errors in their medical

care, according to a new survey. A higher fraction of each group -- 12% of

doctors and 17% of the public -- reported that they or a relative had

suffered a medical error serious enough to cause them to lose time from

school or work.

In all, 35% of physicians and 42% of the public said they had experienced a

medical error themselves, or had one affect a family member. Eighteen

percent of physicians and 24% of the public said the errors had serious

consequences.

The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, is the first

effort to quantify the public's experience with medical mistakes as well as

its opinions about how to prevent them. It was conducted by researchers at

the Harvard School of Public Health and the Henry J. Kaiser Family

Foundation.

Link:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&node=&contentId=A4

3084-2002Dec11&notFound=true

 

NO END TO ERRORS

excerpts from washingtonpost.com, Tuesday, December 3, 2002; Page HE01

The Washington Post featured a December article asserting that much lip

service has been paid to reducing medical error but little has been done to

deliver on the national goals set forth by the Institutes of Medicine in

November 1999.

The Post reported "...experts contend, it's doubtful that patients checking

into most of America's 5,200 hospitals today are any less likely to be

killed or injured than they were on November 29, 1999, when the report was

issued. With the conspicuous exception of the Department of Veterans Affairs

(VA) medical system, whose hospitals have embraced the ethic and many of the

methods that have made aviation and other industries safer, most hospitals

have taken few new steps to protect patients from errors."

The article examined five areas: medication errors, wrong site surgery,

hospital acquired infections, fatigue & Supervision and the nursing shortage

to see what's happened in the three years since the IOM issued its report.

Link: http://www.washingtonpost.com/

 

******************************************************

GRANTS & FUNDING

******************************************************

IT PROJECTS FUNDED UNDER $3M AHRQ GRANTS

 October 18, 2002

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality released more than $3 million

in grants as part of its ongoing Primary Care Practice-Based Research

Networks project. "Many" of the grants will go to information technology

development projects, with disease management and disease surveillance

projects also winning awards, AHRQ announced. 

Among the winners for IT projects, Baylor College of Medicine, Cincinnati

Children's Hospital and the American Academy of Pediatrics won grants.  AHRQ

estimates that a total of $6 million will be dispersed across the project's

three-year span.

Link: http://www.ahcpr.gov/fund/grantix.htm

 

$1.5 MILLION GRANT GOES TO VALLEY HOSPITAL EFFORT TO REDUCE ERRORS

The Record, Bergen County, NJ, Friday, November 1, 2002

Outgoing Rep. Marge S. Roukema secured $1.5 million in funding for her

hometown hospital, The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, in November when

President Bush signed a national defense appropriations bill. Hidden within

the spending measure's fine print was funding for a demonstration project at

Valley about reducing medical errors through the use of supermarket-style

barcodes and hand-held computers. The money is included in funds for "Army

Advanced Medical Development."

The funding enables the pilot project to expand from a few medical-surgical

units at Valley to the entire hospital, "allowing all of the hospital's

patients and staff to benefit from these new technologies," Roukema said in

a press release.

Link: http://www.bergen.com/cgi-bin/page.pl?id=5498423

 

RWJF PROGRAM TO FUND HEALTH CARE IT RESEARCH

IHealthBeat, November 19, 2002

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announced that it would provide $7.25

million in funding to evaluate health care information technology

applications through its Health e-Technologies Initiative. Two separate

categories of grants will provide up to $100,000 for research projects

lasting six months to one year or as much as $600,000 for projects lasting

up to three years.

Projects focused on evaluating, comparing or improving health care IT

applications with regard to changed health behavior or chronic disease

management will be eligible for funding. Projects measuring outcomes,

including changes in patient/physician behavior, health status changes and

impact on costs, also will be eligible for funding.

 

HHS AWARDS $5.9 MILLION CONTRACT TO IMPROVE PATIENT SAFETY DATA COLLECTION

HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson announced a two-year, $5.9 million contract to

improve the department's collection and reporting of patient safety data.

HHS said the contract would lead to the development of a new Web-based

system that will integrate existing systems operated by several agencies to

improve reporting and make the systems easier for frontline care providers

to use. The contract was awarded through the Agency for Healthcare Research

and Quality. It will lead to the development of a system that will link

reports and integrate data from the National Healthcare Safety Network with

the adverse events reporting systems for drugs, biologics, vaccines and

devices.

 

******************************************************

EVENTS

******************************************************

 

HEALTH CARE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 2003

January 14-15, 2003, Los Angeles, CA

This year's conference "Enhancing California Health Care Through Technology"

features case studies that highlight the experiences of a diverse group of

California health care organizations, from mid-sized physician groups and

community clinics to commercial health plans and the Veterans

Administration.

Link: http://www.cahealthit.com/overview.html

 

CREATING SAFER HEALTH CARE IN CHICAGO

Friday, February 7, 2003; University of Chicago

This conference is put on by the Chicago Patient Safety Forum, a

community-based network whose purpose is to facilitate innovative system

approaches to understanding and improving patient safety in the Chicago

metropolitan area.

Link: http://www.chicagopatientsafety.org/

 

WESTPACK SHOW

February 19-21, 2003, Anaheim Convention Center

Since the FDA has postponed its barcode regulation decision until the end of

the year, the first major discussion of its implementation and impact will

likely occur at February's WestPack trade event. The show's technical

conference will feature three major sessions addressing barcode

technologies, including:

+ Bar Coding Unit Doses and Patient Strategy

+ Unit Dose Bar Coding: Bar Coding and HUD/OTC In-Line Printing

+ Unit Dose Bar Coding: Coding Standards, Symbologies, Printing Processes,

and Data Capture Technologies

Other sessions will review bar code printing options and various data

capture technologies and detail the process for in-line printing of bar

codes used in health care.

Link: http://www.westpackshow.com/

 

5TH ANNUAL NPSF PATIENT SAFETY CONGRESS

March 12-15, 2003, Renaissance Washington DC Hotel

Bridge Medical is one of several convenors of this year's conference, which

is entitled, "Let's Get Results: Improving the Safety of Patients"

Link:  http://www.bridgemedical.com/events_2003_mar12.shtml

 

NATIONAL PATIENT SAFETY AWARENESS WEEK -

March 9 -15, 2003

Initially launched in March 2002 by PULSE of New York President Ilene Corina

(and co-chair of the National Patient Safety Foundation's Patient and Family

Advisory Council), Patient Safety Awareness Week (PSAW) is a national

education and awareness-building campaign for improving patient safety at

the local level. Hospitals and healthcare organizations across the country

are encouraged to plan events to promote patient safety within their own

organizations. Educational activities are centered on educating patients on

how to become involved in their own health care, as well as working with

hospitals to build partnerships with their patient community.

For further information regarding what you can do for Patient Safety

Awareness Week go to: http://www.bridgemedical.com/events_2003_mar9.shtml

 

THE 2003 MICHIGAN HEALTH & SAFETY COALITION PATIENT SAFETY CONFERENCE

April 30-May 1, 2003 - Dearborn, MI

The conference is designed for the highest levels of health care leadership,

including chief executive, medical, nursing and financial officers and

governing board members. Concurrent sessions showcasing comparative

practices from across the state will demonstrate practical techniques you

can use for improving quality and safety.

Faculty include:

+ Lucian Leape, MD, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston

+ Peter Pronovost, MD, PhD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore

+ Gerald Hickson, MD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville

+ Judith Pelham, President and CEO, Trinity Health, Novi

Link: http://www.mihealthandsafety.org/patientsafety.html

 

AMERICAN HEALTHCARE'S FOUNDING FATHER

April 28, 2003, San Francisco, CA

Did you know that Benjamin Franklin was co-founder of the first organized

hospital in the United States?  In honor of his contribution, The American

Case Management Association (ACMA) and the Joint Commission on Accreditation

of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) announced The Franklin Award of

Distinction as the first award designed to recognize hospitals that can best

validate its application of collaborative professional practice, effective

service and achieved outcomes which positively affect patient care.

The inaugural winner will be announced at the joint meeting of the 10th

Annual National Institute for Case Management (NICM) Clinical Case

Management Conference and the 4th Annual ACMA Meeting.

Link: http://www.acmaweb.org/franklinaward3.html

 

JAMIA PATIENT SAFETY SUPPLEMENT NOW AVAILABLE

AHRQ sponsored a Patient Safety Track at last year's annual conference of

the American Medical Informatics Association, and selected articles and

presentations from the track are now available as part of a new patient

safety supplement to the November/December issue of the Journal of the

American Medical Informatics Association. The supplement includes a review

article that discusses AHRQ's patient safety initiatives in 2001 as well as

an article on federal government initiatives in patient safety.

To request a copy of the supplement, please send an e-mail to

ahrqpubs@ahrq.gov.

 

******************************************************

BRIDGE NEWS

******************************************************

AMERISOURCEBERGEN FINALIZES PURCHASE OF BRIDGE MEDICAL, INC

Business Wire, Jan 6, 2003

AmerisourceBergen Corporation, the largest pharmaceutical services company

in the U.S. dedicated solely to the pharmaceutical supply chain, announced

the completion of its purchase of Bridge Medical, Inc., the leading provider

of barcode-enabled point-of-care software designed to reduce medication

errors and decrease costs in healthcare facilities.

"We are extremely excited about Bridge's market-leading, proven patient

safety technology," said R. David Yost, AmerisourceBergen's Chief Executive

Officer. "Hospitals and other medical facilities are already using this

technology to increase medication accuracy and improve operating efficiency.

Our customers and suppliers need unique, tailored solutions for delivering

pharmaceuticals, and this acquisition is one more example of our commitment

to enhance our offerings in the pharmaceutical supply channel."

"Combining Bridge's patient safety technology with AmerisourceBergen's high

service distribution capability, the in-pharmacy barcode application

capability of our recently acquired AutoMed operation, and the packaging

options of our American Health Packaging unit provides the kind of

pharmaceutical management solutions our customers are seeking," said Kurt J.

Hilzinger, AmerisourceBergen's President and Chief Operating Officer. "We

now have the most comprehensive service offering in the industry with which

to address the challenges of staffing shortages, medication errors and

rising costs in today's healthcare environment."

Link: http://www.bridgemedical.com/news.shtml

 

VHA TO MEASURE IMPACT OF BRIDGE BARCODE PATIENT SAFETY SYSTEM

Business Wire, Oct. 22, 2002

VHA Inc., a cooperative of 2,200 health care organizations, has signed an

agreement with Bridge Medical to conduct a research study on Bridge's

barcode-enabled MedPoint software system.

"Under terms of the agreement, VHA will measure the extent of MedPoint's

impact on medication-error reduction," explained Don McCall, a group senior

vice president at VHA. "To facilitate participation, incentives will be

offered to a limited number of VHA members that purchase MedPoint software

in time to participate in the study."

"One of VHA's primary missions is helping members improve the quality of

care by increasing access to innovative technologies," noted McCall. "This

agreement enables VHA to evaluate MedPoint and better define its impact on

medication-error reduction. We also want to better understand MedPoint's

compatibility with other IT systems already in use at many hospitals.

Knowledge gained from this effort will help VHA members, and ultimately the

entire industry, make intelligent, effective choices when selecting and

deploying patient safety systems."

The study will begin immediately with completion expected in 2003.

Link:  http://www.bridgemedical.com/news_2002_33.shtml

 

SSM HEALTH CARE FIRST TO WIN THE MALCOLM BALDRIDGE QUALITY AWARD

SSM Health Care is the first health care system in the nation to receive the

Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award.  One SSM hospital, St. Marys

Hospital Medical Center (Madison, WI), a Bridge MedPoint customer, played an

important and laborious role in earning this award by hosting Baldridge

reviewers. St. Mary's referenced their implementation of the MedPoint BPOC

system in the Baldridge application and provided the reviewers with a live

demonstration of the system.   

"This organization has demonstrated the ability to meet market challenges

while improving the quality of compassionate health care," said President

Bush. HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson cited SSM's work with patient feedback

and physician communications as "an outstanding example of what can be done

when fresh thinking and modern science are brought to the delivery of health

care in America."

Link: http://www.bridgemedical.com/st_marys.shtml

 

VENTURE COMPANY OF THE YEAR?

San Diego Venture Group has selected Bridge Medical as one of three

finalists for its Venture Capital Success Story of 2002 program.

Link: http://www.bridgemedical.com/awards.shtml

 

"THE IMPACT OF IT ON PATIENT SAFETY" NAMED HIMSS BOOK OF THE YEAR!

The Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) has named

"The Impact of Information Technology on Patient Safety" HIMSS Book of the

Year.  Bridge Medical COO and VP of Operations, Rusty Lewis served as editor

for the publication.  With chapters authored by a veritable 'who's who' of

patient safety experts, the book is designed to keep healthcare information

technology professionals abreast of important patient safety issues.

The Impact of Information Technology on Patient Safety is available for $50

for HIMSS members ($60 regular price). To purchase a copy, call 312/664-4467

or log on to www.himss.org